Pidonia scripta

Pidonia scripta

This is the last thing I’ll be posting for the next ten days or so. I’m heading off to s Oregon/n California to see what kind of things I can find and share here. Lichens, conifers, and millipedes are the objectives, but winter came in a bit earlier than I expected so I won’t be going everyplace that I’d hoped to explore. But I figure the beautiful country will be reward enough, and, since many of those areas have significantly different ecosystems than those around Vancouver, Washington, I’m bound to find some things I’ve never profiled (or even seen!), before. 

Pidonia scripta

I found these two longhorn beetles back on June 1, 2022, when Pam and I visited the spot in the Columbia River Gorge where we had gotten married three years ago on that day. They were an easy identification, but I resisted posting a profile of them because of a dearth of information on the life history of this species. But having just finished packing for the trip, and wanting to get another profile out before my trip, I went back to these beautiful longhorn beetles, because I knew this was something I could get finished before I depart in the morning. 

Pidonia scripta

Description-Small (6-9mm long), slender beetle with dark reddish brown to black head and pronotum, light reddish brown legs, and yellow brown to tan elytra with a dark, angled slash near the front of the elytra, a dark spot near the margin in the middle of the elytra, and a dark blotch near the end of the elytra. 

Similar species– The combination of size and elytral pattern is unique in our region; Ortholeptura valida are much larger and have spots near the front of the elytra. 

Pidonia scripta

Habitat-Moist to mesic deciduous woodlands and mixed forests. 

Range-Western North America; in our region they are found west of the crest of the Cascades, as well as in n Idaho and nw Montana. 

Eats-Larval hosts are oaks, Oregon myrtle, a decaying branch of a maple (Vlasak; 2014) and probably other deciduous trees as well; adults visit flowers

Eaten by-Probably insectivores of all classes. 

Pidonia scripta

Adults active-Diurnal; May through July

Life cycle– I can find nothing specific for this species, but the eggs are likely laid on bark, and the larvae bore into the trees; larvae probably overwinter in the tree and pupate in the spring. 

Etymology of namesPidonia may be from the Greek word for a fountain/spring, but I cannot corroborate that. The specific epithet scripta is from the Latin word ‘writing’, and likely refers to the elytral pattern, but I can’t confirm that either. 

Pidonia scripta

https://bugguide.net/node/view/162024

https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/31410/pidonia_scripta.html

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Josef-Vlasak-2/publication/281044705_New_Larval_Host_Records_for_North_American_Cerambycidae_Coleoptera/links/62aeb272e1193368baa9508c/New-Larval-Host-Records-for-North-American-Cerambycidae-Coleoptera.pdf

Pidonia scripta

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